Cruise Reports: Galapagos

Espanola Island

From the National Geographic Polaris in Galapagos

Blue-footed booby incubating

Blue-footed booby incubating

This was, without a doubt, an amazing day from the very beginning to the very end. We had a very early wake-up call for those who were interested in photography and a second wake-up call for those more interested in Galápagos natural history. At the end of the morning activities, everybody had had a good time, enjoying the wonders of this magical natural place.

Espanola is one of those places were it is difficult to keep a steady pace, because of the abundance of wildlife. The main actors and actresses in Galápagos are the animals which have been living here for millions of years, and many are found here and nowhere else.

Some of our guests even thought that all the Galápagos animals enjoy posing for pictures; this is still a unique place were the fauna has no fear of human beings. People came back on board with happy faces and lots of wonderful pictures of blue footed boobies, Nazca boobies, Española mockingbirds, marine iguanas, lava lizards, Galápagos doves, sea lions, Darwin’s finches, and the gladiators of the sky, the waved albatrosses.

Walter Perez, Naturalist

Walter Perez, Naturalist

After a much deserved lunch and nap, we had a presentation from Jack Swenson, one of our Photo Experts onboard National Geographic Polaris, about tips for photographing in the Galápagos Islands.

We started our afternoon activities at Gardner Bay. This is the same island, but at the northeastern side. From the glass bottom boat we learned to identify the aquatic life of these Oceanic islands. Deep water snorkelers explored one area while kayakers paddled along the coast of Gardener Islet. Others among us learned, through snorkeling lessons, to safely explore the underwater world.

This was the end of an amazing day in paradise that will stay in our memories forever.

— Walter Perez, Naturalist, National Geographic Polaris

Advertisements

Posted on December 21, 2008, in Galapagos and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: